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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
The Republic of Sonora was a short-lived, unrecognized federal republic ruled by filibuster William Walker in 1854. It was based in Baja California, which also claimed (but never controlled) Sonora. In the summer of 1853, an American adventurer and filibuster named William Walker traveled to Guaymas seeking a grant from the government of Mexico to create a colony that would serve as a fortified frontier, protecting US soil from raids by Native Americans. Mexico refused, and Walker returned to San ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
One of the most visited tourist attractions in Mazatlan due to its mystery and antiquity is the Cueva del Diablo ("Devil’s Cave"), a place that is sheltered by the slopes of the Cerro de la Nevería and which is located on Paseo Claussen. It is a place that for more than 200 years has been surrounded by tales and legends that the Mazatlecos continue to share from generation to generation. In the holiday season, the Devil’s Cave is very visited, ...
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Sombrero ("hat", literally "shadower") refers to a type of wide-brimmed hat from Mexico, used to shield from the sun. It usually has a high pointed crown, an extra-wide brim (broad enough to cast a shadow over the head, neck and shoulders of the wearer, and slightly upturned at the edge), and a chin string to hold it in place. In Spanish, sombrero refers to any wide-brimmed hat. Sombreros, like the cowboy hats invented later, were designed in response to the ...
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Pulque, occasionally referred to as agave wine, is an alcoholic beverage made from the fermented sap of the maguey (agave) plant. It is traditional to central Mexico, where it has been produced for millennia. It has the color of milk, somewhat viscous consistency and a sour yeast-like taste. The manufacturing process of pulque is complex and required the death of the maguey plant. As the plant nears maturity, the center begins to swell and elongate as the plant gathers stored ...
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Agave is a genus of monocots native to the hot and arid regions of Mexico. The plants are perennial, but each rosette flowers once and then dies. Some species are known by the name "century plant" because of the long time the plant takes to flower. Agaves are succulents with a large rosette of thick, fleshy leaves, with most species ending in a sharp terminal spine. The stout stem is usually short, the leaves apparently springing from the root. Along ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
If living the life of the Zapotec is a cultural experience you could appreciate there's no better way perhaps than to book a room at one or several of the special Zapotec Yu'u constructed in various villages across the Oaxaca Valley. Yú'ù is a Zapotec word meaning house, and in this particular case, local houses that have been refitted to accommodate tourists wanting to get up close and personal with the local way of life. The Tourist Yú'ù are each ...
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Artisanal Mezcal in Oaxaca: No Two Batches Are Alike No, not all mezcal distilled in Oaxaca is smoky, and no, the difference between tequila and its misunderstood cousin is not that the former is commercial or industrial and the latter is handcrafted. But the truth is that the lesser known Mexican agave based spirit is catching on globally. One reason is that no two batches of artisanal mezcal are the same. Why? This article explains some of the reasons. Let’s ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Another pre-Hispanic find in Mexico City. Commercial center renovations uncovered remains that surprised archaeologists. Nearly 500 years after its fall, Tenochtitlán continues to be rediscovered, meter by meter. The latest to be uncovered are the remains of the ceremonial center of the Calpulli of Cuezcontitlán, found a few meters under the streets of Mexico City, several blocks south of the Zócalo near the Plaza Pino Suárez commercial center. In Aztec society, a calpulli, or large house, was the designation for ...
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A cenote is a natural pit, or sinkhole, resulting from the collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes groundwater underneath. Especially associated with the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico, cenotes were sometimes used by the ancient Maya for sacrificial offerings. The term derives from a word used by the low-land Yucatec Maya "ts'onot" to refer to any location with accessible groundwater. Cenotes are surface connections to subterranean water bodies. While the best-known cenotes are large open water pools measuring tens of meters ...
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Each metro station in Mexico City is identified by a single icon. Created in a time when the country’s literacy rate was low and the capital city’s metro system was small, the design concept was intuitive and easy to execute. Since one-third of the Mexican population could not read or write and most of the rest had not completed high school, it was thought that patrons would find it easier to guide themselves with a system based on colors and ...
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Altar dedicated to the god Ehécatl, located in the middle of Metro Pino Suárez, in the Cuauhtémoc borough of Mexico City, on the southern part of the city centre. This altar was unearthed during construction of the station in 1967 where it remains to this day surrounded by the passageway between Lines 1 and 2. Back in the sixties the government, in preparation for the upcoming Olympic games of 1968 decided to start building the subway in Mexico City. While ...
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Quetzal are strikingly colored birds in the trogon family. They are found in forests, especially in humid highlands, with the five species from the genus Pharomachrus being exclusively Neotropical, while a single species, Euptilotis neoxenus, is found in Mexico and very locally in southern United States. They are fairly large (all over 32 cm or 13 inches long), slightly bigger than other trogon species. Quetzals have iridescent green or golden-green wing coverts, back, chest and head, with a red belly ...
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The list of UNESCO World Heritage sites in Mexico is the most in all of the Americas and also most 7th in the world. There are 35 sites: 27 cultural sites, 6 natural sites and 2 mixed site. Historic Centre of Mexico City and Xochimilco (1987) Today, Mexico City is one of the largest and most populated cities in the world. But before it became what it is now, it was the old Aztec capital and was built by the ...
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A macuahuitl is a wooden club with obsidian blades. The name is derived from the Nahuatl language and means "hand-wood". Its sides are embedded with prismatic blades traditionally made from obsidian; obsidian is capable of producing an edge sharper than high quality steel razor blades. The macuahuitl was a standard close combat weapon. Use of the maquahuitl as a weapon is attested from the first millennium CE. By the time of the Spanish conquest the macuahuitl was widely distributed in ...
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During the first years of the 20th century, French explorer, Count Maurice de Perigny, ventured into the dense forest of Campeche, and discovered several new and enigmatic Maya sites, which had gone completely unnoticed until then. Although the region had already been visited years before by the Austrian Teobert Maler, it was Perigny who realized that the ancient architecture of southeastern Campeche was different from that which existed in the Petén region in Guatemala and to the north on the ...
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Guanajuato, a Colonial city in central Mexico, is home of the incredible Museo de las Momias. The Mummies of Guanajuato are a number of naturally mummified bodies interred during a cholera outbreak around Guanajuato, Mexico in 1833. The human bodies appear to have been disinterred between 1870 and 1958. During that time, a local tax was in place requiring a fee to be paid for "perpetual" burial. Some bodies for which the tax was not paid were disinterred, and some—apparently ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Challenging the law of gravity in nature is an impossible undertaking, but even Albert Einstein himself would have been stunned by an inexplicable happening on a hill in Comala, Mexico. And it is that in an elevation in the state of Colima, 4 kilometers from the Comala-San Antonio road and minutes from the town of Suchitlán, vehicles, bottles and even water roll upwards as attracted by a magnet, when by force of Gravitation should do the opposite. It is not ...
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Greater Mexico City refers to the conurbation around Mexico City, officially called Valley of Mexico Metropolitan Area (Zona Metropolitana del Valle de México or ZMCM). Greater Mexico City constituted by Mexico City (composed of 16 boroughs) and 49 adjacent municipalities of Mexico State and 1 munisipality of Hidalgo state. For normative purposes, however, Greater Mexico City most commonly refers to the Metropolitan Area of the Valley of Mexico (Zona Metropolitana del Valle de México) an agglomeration that incorporates 18 additional ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Christmas in Mexico is celebrated during a season that begins in early December to January 6, with one other related event on February 2. During this entire time, one can see nativity scenes, poinsettias and Christmas trees. The season begins with celebrations related to the Virgin of Guadalupe, the patroness of Mexico, followed by traditions such as Las Posadas and pastorelas. There is a mass and feast on Christmas Eve, the arrival of the Three Wise Men on January 6 ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Mexico is one of the world’s most popular vacation destinations with over 20 million foreign visitors a year. Famous for its tequila, the Aztecs and the Mayas, beach resorts on the Pacific and Caribbean side, Mexico can offer something for every sort of traveler. A list of the most amazing tourist attractions in Mexico: .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Mexican street food, called antojitos (literally "little cravings"), is prepared by street vendors and at small traditional markets in Mexico. Street foods include tacos, tamales, gorditas, quesadillas, empalmes, tostadas, chalupa, elote, tlayudas, cemita, pambazo, empanada, nachos, chilaquiles, fajita and tortas, as well as fresh fruit, vegetables, beverages and soups such as menudo, pozole and pancita. Most are available in the morning and the evening, as mid-afternoon is the time for the main formal meal of the day. Mexico has one ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
The presence of street vendors in Mexico City (known locally in mexican spanish as ambulantes) dates back to pre-Hispanic era and over the centuries the government has struggled to control it, with most recently a clearing of downtown streets of vendors in 2007, but despite this there is a persistent presence of many thousands illegally. In 2003 it was estimated that there were almost 200,000 street vendors in Mexico City. Prior to the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, commercial ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Mexico is a huge country and the weather varies by season and region. There really is no bad time to visit Mexico, but certain times of the year may appeal to different people more than others, and some destinations and activities may be better at certain times of the year. The optimum time to visit is generally between December and April, when there is virtually no rain. The coolest months are between December and February, while the wet season begins ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Snorkeling and Scuba diving are some of the most popular activities to enjoy in Mexico's beach destinations. Mexico's coastlines are teeming with colorful underwater life and no doubt you'll want to see it for yourself. Scuba diving requires special training and complicated equipment, but just about anyone can snorkel without any particular preparation—if you choose an easy spot, you don't even really need to know how to swim. You’re bound to spot some interesting fish and other sea creatures and ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
From Cancun to the Riviera Maya, from Baja California to the Pacific Coast, Mexico is a never-ending treasure trove of travel memories waiting to happen. Though there are many more, here are at least 10 reasons to visit Mexico. Natural Beauty. Orange sunsets that take your breath away. Purple mountain majesties that tumble to the sea. Turquoise sand kissed by sugar-white sand. Discover one-of-a-kind flora and fauna. Natural mineral pool in Oaxaca that looks like a waterfall that’s been frozen ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Mexico has somehow gained a reputation for only catering to all-inclusive resort goers, or for being too dangerous for. Neither of which are true. Backpacking Mexico is a trip you’ll never forget. Sure, Cabo San Lucas, Cancun, Puerto Vallarta and Mazatlan are popular with people on a one week holiday, and yes, there are some very dangerous areas in the country. But once you’re on the ground and are actually backpacking Mexico, you’ll see that this country has a lot ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Mexico is a country with a rich history, one of pre-Hispanic culture and then Western invasion and colonisation, thanks to the Spanish. Highly questionable ethics aside, it’s impossible to deny the impact this colonial history has left on modern day Mexico and one of the most obvious ways it presents itself is through architecture. Here are the top ten most historic, must-visit colonial cities in Mexico. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Mexico is home to numerous resorts, particularly around its most stunning tourist regions, like Cabo San Lucas, Cancun and the Riviera Maya. For the best of the best, consider a getaway at one of these amazing Mexican resorts. A combination of white sand beaches and upscale resorts, Mexico is the perfect vacation destination for those looking for relaxing fun in the sun. Whether you soak in the sunshine from a private cabana, opt for a tequila tasting, book an exotic ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Mexico was the cradle of a number of important civilizations that developed throughout the region. There are over 180 archaeological sites in Mexico that are open to the public. For the archaeology enthusiast, all are worth visiting, but there are a few that stand out from the rest in their size and magnificence. Mexico’s ancient civilizations were the most sophisticated and formidable in North and Central America, and their cities and sacred precincts are a national treasure and a highlight ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
An artistic expression of the mayan culture. Mayan architecture is one of the most awesome features of Mayan art to admire on your travel to any area of the Mayan World. Even after over 2000 years, the magnificence in Mayan architecture and artistic skills of these outstanding Mayan people are still present in all the Mayan pyramids. You can admire their achievments in every temple and in all other Mayan structures, in the Mexican States of Yucatan, Quintana Roo, Campeche, ...
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A Symbol of Divinity. Mayan masks were representations of Mayan gods, as well as part of a very sacred funeral ritual in the Mayan Classic Period from 250 to 900 AD. These were placed over the face of an important ruler when he died. Mayan masks endowed the rulers with the status of a divine being as the “Tree of the Universe”. The funeral masks protected them while descending into the underworld “Xibalba” in order to defeat the gods of ...
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An exquisite expression of mayan art. Mayan pottery has been part of the Mayans´ lives since ancient times. It is also important in the study of the Pre Columbian Mayan culture, because each piece reveals stories of rulers, rituals, the story of the Maya creation, as well as other aspects of the Maya civilization. In the early beginnings, during the Late Preclassic period from 250 BC to 250 AD, Mayan pottery consisted in elementary kitchen utensils, like bowls, pots and ...
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A colorful expression of Mayan skills and inspiration. Mayan weaving is mostly done by the Mayan women, who after thousands of years continue producing their beautiful and varied items by means of a waistloom. Their skill in weaving has been taught to them generation after generation by their grandmothers and mothers, starting at a very young age. In many of the weavings you will find ancient Mayan symbols referring to some of their gods and to their vision of the ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Sorry, your browser does not support this audio tag. Mariachi is a musical expression that dates back to at least 18th century in Western Mexico. It is a tradition that can be defined by eight socio-musical elements: mariachi instrumentation and texture, musical genres and subgenres, performance methods and styles, singing styles and forms, dance styles, performative space, performance clothing, and the word "mariachi". Each element has its own history, originated at varying moments in time and in different regions of ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
Chinampa (Nahuatl: chināmitl) is a type of Mesoamerican agriculture which used small, rectangular areas of fertile arable land to grow crops on the shallow lake beds in the Valley of Mexico. Although different technology existed during the Post-classic and Colonial periods in the basin, chinampas have raised many questions on agricultural production and political development. After the Aztec Triple Alliance formed, the conquest of southern basin city-states, such as Xochimilco, was one of the first strategies of imperial expansion. Prior ...
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Lake Texcoco ("Lago de Texcoco") was a natural lake within the "Anahuac" or Valley of Mexico. Lake Texcoco is best known as where the Aztecs built the city of Tenochtitlan, which was located on an island within the lake. After the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, efforts to control flooding by the Spanish led to most of the lake being drained. The entire lake basin is now almost completely occupied by Mexico City, the capital of the present-day nation ...
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Mēxihco is the Nahuatl term for the heartland of the Aztec Empire, namely, the Valley of Mexico, and its people, the Mexica, and surrounding territories. This became the future State of Mexico as a division of New Spain prior to independence (compare Latium). It is generally considered to be a toponym for the valley which became the primary ethnonym for the Aztec Triple Alliance as a result, or vice versa. After New Spain won independence from Spain, representatives decided to ...
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Mexico Travel Guide | Visit and Explore Mexico
Alebrijes are brightly colored Mexican folk art sculptures of fantastical creatures. The first alebrijes, along with use of the term, originated with Pedro Linares. In the 1930s, Linares fell very ill and while he was in bed, unconscious, Linares dreamt of a strange place resembling a forest. There, he saw trees, animals, rocks, clouds that suddenly turned into something strange, some kind of animals, but, unknown animals. He saw a donkey with butterfly wings, a rooster with bull horns, a ...
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Mexico Travel Guide | Visit and Explore Mexico

Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican ancestry living in other places, especially the United States. It is acknowledged internationally in many other cultures. The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. In 2008, the tradition was inscribed in the ...
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Mexico Travel Guide | Visit and Explore Mexico
La Calavera Catrina ('Dapper Skeleton', 'Elegant Skull') is a 1910–1913 zinc etching by famous Mexican printmaker, cartoon illustrator and lithographer José Guadalupe Posada. The image depicts a female skeleton dressed only in a hat befitting the upper class outfit of a European of her time. Her chapeau en attende is related to European styles of the early 20th century. She is offered as a satirical portrait of those Mexican natives who, Posada felt, were aspiring to adopt European aristocratic traditions ...
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You must contact the official SAGARPA-SENASICA personnel to make a Certificate of Import of your pet, for this purpose, the officer will perform a physical and documentary inspection, to verify compliance with the following requirements: 1. Present a Certificate of Health in original and simple copy with the following elements:
  • Issued by an official veterinarian of the competent authority or if it is a particular one, on letterhead paper, with the number of the professional certificate printed or a ...
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The Maya pyramids were built to be climbed. They usually have steep stairways rising to the top, where there is often a temple or, at least, an altar. The views over the rest of the ruins and the jungle were enough to reduce grown men to tears of wonder. Millions of people, in the past, have made the pilgrimage up them. From the top of ancient pyramides the jungle looks like a living green carpet. Advice abounds on how to ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
The Mesoamerican ballgame was a sport with ritual associations played since 1400 BC by the pre-Columbian peoples of Ancient Mesoamerica. The sport had different versions in different places during the millennia, and a newer more modern version of the game, ulama, is still played in a few places by the indigenous population. The rules of the game are not known, but judging from its descendant, ulama, they were probably similar to racquetball, where the aim is to keep the ball ...
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Tenochtitlan, originally known as México-Tenochtitlan, was a Mexica city-state on an island in Lake Texcoco in the Valley of Mexico. Founded on June 20, 1325, it was the capital of the expanding Aztec Empire in the 15th century until it was captured by the Spanish in 1521. At its peak, it was the largest city in the Pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlan are in the historic center ...
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Free Mexico Travel Guide and Travel Information
The 2003 Colima earthquake occurred on 21 January with a moment magnitude of 7.5 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe). The epicenter was located on the Pacific coast in the Mexican state of Colima. The earthquake was felt as far away as Mexico City and in southern parts of the United States. The 2003 Colima earthquake resulted in the death of 29 people and 300 injured. Additionally, approximately 10,000 were left homeless as the earthquake destroyed 2,005 homes ...
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The 2017 Chiapas earthquake struck at 23:49 CDT on 7 September (local time; 04:49 on the 8th UTC) in the Gulf of Tehuantepec off the southern coast of Mexico, near state of Chiapas, approximately 87 kilometres (54 mi) south of Pijijiapan, with a Mercalli intensity of IX (Violent). The magnitude was estimated to be Mw 8.1. The earthquake caused some buildings in Mexico City to tremble, prompting people to evacuate. It also generated a tsunami with waves of 1.75 metres ...
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The 2017 Central Mexico earthquake struck at 13:14 CDT (18:14 UTC) on 19 September 2017 with a magnitude estimated to be Mw 7.1 and strong shaking for about 20 seconds. It was epicentered approximately 55 km (34 mi) south of the city of Puebla. The earthquake caused damage in the Mexican states of Puebla, Morelos and the Greater Mexico City area, resulting in the collapse of more than forty buildings. Although Mexico's SASMEX earthquake warning system provided 20 seconds of ...
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